Skip Navigation

Calendar

copy_of_googlecaldcrp.jpg

Text:
Increase font size
Decrease font size

    DCRP hosts the Divided Cities and Regions Symposium

    Negotiating Conflict Between People, Business and Government

    Development occurs in the context of conflict, and development can be the cause of conflict. Whether the project is the sole cause or merely the catalyst, the process of development agitates some of our deepest beliefs about progress, sustainability, equity and justice. Top scholars, professionals and students all recently came together at DCRP to discuss how to mediate conflict in the practice of urban planning. Presentations covered a wide range of topics from urban planning in the world's most divided cities (Jerusalem and Nicosia) to building trust with minority populations while preparing disaster management relief plans.

    bollens.JPG

    "The symposium highlighted an important reality- that the mediation of conflict in the practice of urban planning (whether in international or American settings) is a foundational challenge facing the profession as we move into the future," says Scott Bollens (Ph.D. ’87), Warmington Chair in Peace and International Cooperation at UCI.

    elliott.JPGelliott2.JPG

    The Symposium began with a student skills workshop led by Michael Elliott, Associate Professor of City and Regional Planning at Georgia Tech. Dr. Elliott has conducted numerous student and professional training workshops in the field of public policy collaboration, conflict management and negotiation.  In the workshop, Elliot demonstrated how characteristics, communication, feedback, social context, alternatives and goals all feature in the negotiation process.  The collaborative process then extended to an exercise where students role-played the various and competing project interests of developers, neighborhoods and states.


    David Godschalk, Stephen Baxter Professor Emeritus, FAICP, began the symposium’s morning session by framing the discussion with his talk, titled “Bridging Fault Zones in Divided Cities and Regions.”

    godschalk.JPG

    Godschalk asked whether cities and regions are more divided today, and questioned what we know about resolving conflicts.  What role can planners play in the search for successful conflict resolution in a sustainable framework?  Godschalk suggests that we face many new realities, with a future that is rapidly evolving and uncertain.  Growth and decline must be monitored and plans designed to respond strategically as evidence demands.  Sources of instability include linkages among: climate condition, water resources, energy supply, economy, human health and natural hazards.



    Lawrence Susskind, Ford Professor of Urban and Environmental Planning at MIT
    Professor Susskind directs the Graduate Program in Environmental Policy and Planning at MIT. His primary contributions are in the fields of urban and environmental planning, negotiation and dispute resolution, and mutlilateral treaty negotiation. 
    susskind.JPG


    Practitioner:
    Pedro Rios, Director, U.S./Mexico Border Program at AFSC
    Mr. Rios's program works to secure human rights and self-determination for migrants and border communities by facilitating leadership development, accompanying immigrant communities in their organizing processes, providing technical support and resources, and promoting collective action through human rights committees. His office documents human rights abuses to challenge systemic abuses by the Border Patrol and other government agencies.
    rios.JPG

    Divded Cities and Regions Symposium keynote speakers:
    David Godschalk, Stephen Baxter Professor Emeritus, FAICP
    Scott Bollens (Ph.D. ’87) - Warmington Chair in Peace and International Cooperation at University of California, Irvine
    Michael Elliott, Associcate Professor of City and Regional Planning at Georgia Tech
    Lawrence Susskind, Ford Professor of Urban and Environmental Planning at MIT.

    Practitioner’s perspective:
    Pedro Rios, Director, U.S./Mexico Border Program at AFSC
    John Cooper (Ph.D. ‘04) Director, FEMA Emergency Preparedness Program at MDC
    Katherine Lewis Parker, Legal Director at ACLU North Carolina

    Student case studies:
    Anisha Steephen (MCRP ’12) Economic and Community Devel.
    Uri Pachter (MCRP ’12) Transportation and Real Estate Devel.
    Maire Dekle (MCRP ’12) Comm. Development and Placemaking
    Daniel Brookshire (MCRP ’12) Land Use and Env. Planning

    Pictures from the event: (view the full album here)
    talk4.JPG
    copy_of_talk.JPG
    talk2.JPG
    talk3.JPG
    netgotx.JPG
    group4.JPG
    group2.JPG

      More pictures from the event: (view the full album here)

      Sponsors:
      Carolina Planners' Forum, UNC-CH Department of City and Regional Planning, Carolina Planning Journal, Duke-UNC Rotary Center for International Studies in Peace and Conflict Resolution

      Document Actions