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    Pharmaceutical Mergers Yield Spinoffs

    Researching the industrial genesis of the Research Triangle region, Lowe and Feldman are actively engaged in a project that follows the development of the regional economy over a 50 year period.

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    Research on Research Triangle

    Nichola Lowe, Associate Professor @ DCRP at UNC
    Maryann Feldman, Professor in the Department of Public Policy at UNC, DCRP Adjunct Professor

    Researching the industrial genesis of the Research Triangle region, Lowe and Feldman are actively engaged in a project that follows the development of the regional economy over a 50 year period.  Using a unique database of 3200 entrepreneurial ventures, this project attempts to understand the institutional dynamics that created a vibrant regional economy, and hopes to provide a replicable template for integrating large datasets to use in the study of regional economies.

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    When large pharmaceutical corporations like Glaxo and Burroughs Wellcome went through mergers, more than 2,500 people entered the labor market looking for new opportunities. Because of the Triangle's strong entrepreneurial support networks and world class research institutions, many of these highly skilled workers opted to start their own spinoff businesses in the Research Triangle.

    The video titled, "Pharmaceutical Mergers Yield Spinoffs," was created for the Institute for Emerging Issues at NC State and will be part of a series on North Carolina featured at the new James Hunt library at NC State.

    More information

    Restructuring for Resilience. Feldman, M.P. and N. Lowe. (2011).
    Innovations: Technology, Governance, Globalization, 6 (1): 129-146.

    Dr. Lowe's
    research focuses primarily on local economic development and adjustment in the North American context. She is especially interested in the local support systems that enable firms to engage in innovative activities, particularly during periods of economic volatility. A central concern of her work is the accountability of business assistance and workforce development programs and supports to the larger host community.  Her research not only raises questions about the impact of local support systems on firm performance and survivability, but the degree to which supporting actors—both public and private—can shape the upgrading and upskilling path of local firms in ways that reflect and reinforce higher-order developmental goals and community values.

    Maryann P. Feldman is the Heninger Distinguished Professor in the Department of Public Policy at the University of North Carolina. Her research and teaching interests focus on the areas of innovation, the commercialization of academic research and the factors that promote technological change and economic growth. A large part of Dr. Feldman’s work concerns the geography of innovation – investigating the reasons why innovation clusters spatially and the mechanisms that support and sustain industrial clusters. Her dissertation, which was subsequently published as a book, was entitled the Geography of Innovation.

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