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    Extreme Housing Conditions in North Carolina

    Many North Carolina communities are experiencing an affordable housing crisis, which is particularly severe for those who rent.

    ExtremeHousingInteractiveMap.jpg
    In addition to the report, an interactive map of Extreme Housing Conditions in North Carolina can be found by clicking on the map above.
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    Many North Carolina communities are experiencing an affordable housing crisis, which is particularly severe for those who rent. This report examines severe housing cost burden, overcrowding and substandard housing conditions among renters in the state. It identifies areas in our state with extreme housing needs, defined as having relatively high levels of at least two of the following three indicators: severe housing cost burden, overcrowding and the lack of complete kitchen and bathroom facilities.


    Among the report’s findings:

    • Census tracts with extreme housing conditions were found in 46 of North Carolina’s 100 counties and in all three geographic regions.
    • As of 2013, more than 377,000, or 28.2 percent, of the State’s rental households experienced severe cost burdens, were overcrowded or lacked critical facilities.
    • The number of severely cost-burdened households increased by 53,737 or 22.5 percent between 2008 and 2013.
    • In eight census tracts, over 60 percent of renter households were severely cost burdened, with the highest percentage being 77.4 percent in a Wake County tract.
    • The number of overcrowded households increased by 20,437, or 45.4 percent, between 2008 and 2013.
    • In six census tracts, over 30 percent of renter households were overcrowded, with the highest rate being 53 percent in a Wake County tract.

    The executive summary can be found here

     

    By William Rohe, Todd Owen and Sarah Kerns
    Center for Urban and Regional Studies
    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    2017



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