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    THE SCHOOL THAT JACK BUILT: Alumni Stories Through the Decades (Nov. 14th)

    Join us for an entertaining look at the history of planning education through the decades. Alumni panel discussion and reception.

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    Authors Ed Kaiser (’66, FAICP) and Karla Rosenberg (’12) will start the evening with an introduction of the newly released book titled: THE SCHOOL THAT JACK BUILT: City and Regional Planning at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1945–2012. A panel discussion and reception will follow.

     






    THE SCHOOL THAT JACK BUILT: Alumni Stories Through The Decades
    Thursday, November 14th
    Gerrard Hall @ 5:30PM
    Alumni panel discussion and reception

    Alumni Panel Members:
    Jonathan Howes (’61, UNC Senior Public Service Fellow)
    David Godschalk (’64, FAICP and Stephen Baster Professor)
    George Williams (’68, AICP, Architect – Planner - Preservation)
    Deborah Warren (’74, N.C. Legal Services Resource Center)
    Ben Hitchings (’97, Morrisville Planning Director)
    Christy Raulli (’10, Dev. Finance Initiative at UNC School of Gov.)

    The Department of City and Regional Planning (DCRP) at UNC-Chapel Hill was the seventh university planning program in the country and the first to be based in the social sciences.  Boldly initiated in 1945 on a university campus with no architecture or engineering program, DCRP was entrusted to a young administrator who had not yet completed his graduate degree in planning at MIT.  Despite its atypical start, DCRP would establish a solid foothold by the early 1950s and grow in size and reputation over the next six decades. We hope that the story of this planning education enterprise will be of value to those who studied and taught within its walls, perhaps providing an impetus to reflect on past efforts, friends, and experiences while appreciating a good story.  We also hope that story will be of interest to current students and friends of DCRP, and perhaps to planning education historians looking for insights into the evolution of planning education.


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